Reading: Past and Future Earth: Archaeology and Soil Studies on Ambergris Caye, Belize

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Past and Future Earth: Archaeology and Soil Studies on Ambergris Caye, Belize

Authors:

Elizabeth Graham ,

UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Richard Whittet,

Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, GB
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Phillip Austin,

UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Lindsay Duncan,

UCL Institute of Archaeology & UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Manuel Arroyo-Kalin,

UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Julia Stegemann,

UCL Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Simon Turner,

UCL Department of Geography, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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John Crowther,

University of Wales, Trinity Saint David, Lampeter, GB
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Richard Macphail,

UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H 0PY, GB
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Cristina Rosique

Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, GB
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Abstract

Marco Gonzalez is one of a number of Maya sites on Belize’s coast and cayes (coral islands) that exhibit anomalous vegetation and dark-coloured soils. Like Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs), the soils are sought locally for cultivation and are underlain by anthropogenic deposits. Our research is aimed at assessing the role of the anthro- pogenic deposits in soil formation processes with a view to developing strategies to quantify the long-term environmental impact of human activities today. 

How to Cite: Graham, E., Whittet, R., Austin, P., Duncan, L., Arroyo-Kalin, M., Stegemann, J., Turner, S., Crowther, J., Macphail, R. and Rosique, C., 2016. Past and Future Earth: Archaeology and Soil Studies on Ambergris Caye, Belize. Archaeology International, 19, pp.97–108. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/ai.1916
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  Published on 12 Dec 2016

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