Bookshelf: A selection of recent publications from the Institute of Archaeology

UCL Institute of Archaeology – Left Coast Press publications

Since 2006, Institute of Archaeology books have been published by Left Coast Press, Walnut Creek, California (distributed via their European distributor, Eurospan). Left Coast Press also distributes older Institute of Archaeology publications. Left Coast Press publishes two series of books for the Institute: the general IoA series (series editor Ruth Whitehouse) and the Critical Cultural Heritage sub-series (series editor Beverley Butler). A standardised cover design was introduced in 2012.

Recent publications in the Critical Cultural Heritage sub-series include:

African Homecoming: Pan-African Ideology and the Politics of Heritage.

Katerina Schramm (2010)
African Homecoming: Pan-African Ideology and the Politics of Heritage.

An analysis of how ‘home-coming’ is constructed by African hosts and Diasporan returnees. It shows how a shared rhetoric of the (Pan-)African family is both produced and also contested in practice.

Translating Museums: A Counterhistory of South Asian Museology

Shaila Bhatti (2012)
Translating Museums: A Counterhistory of South Asian Museology.

This study of the Lahore Museum in Pakistan is one of the first books to offer an in-depth historical and ethnographic analysis of a South Asian museum. It reveals that the local perceptions and uses of museums in non-Western societies are fraught with social, political and cultural implications.

The Politics of Heritage Management in Mali: From UNESCO to Djenné

Charlotte Louise Joy (2012)
The Politics of Heritage Management in Mali: From UNESCO to Djenné.

Djenné, in modern day Mali, is an UNESCO World Heritage Site which is acclaimed as an enduring wonder of the ancient African world. In this revealing study, the author critically examines how the politics of heritage management, conservation and authenticity play essential roles in the construction of Djenné’s past and its appropriation for contemporary purposes.

 Mundane Objects: Materiality and Non-verbal Communication.

Pierre Lemonnier (2012)
Mundane Objects: Materiality and Non-verbal Communication.

This book demonstrates the importance of objects that, despite their ‘ordinariness’, lie at the heart of their makers’ and users’ systems of thought and practices. This concise work will interest all those who see the intertwining of ‘function’ and ‘style’ as the very mark of all cultural behaviour: anthropologists and archaeologists, sociologists, historians, philosophers, cognitive anthropologists and primatologists.

Intangible Heritage and the Museum

Marilena Alivizatou (2012)
Intangible Heritage and the Museum.

The relationship between museums and the new concept of ‘intangible heritage’ are investigated in this international study. The rise of intangible heritage within the global sphere of UN cultural policy is charted and its implications for international politics, as well as for museological practice and critical theory, are explored.

Recently published in the general series:

Computational Approaches to Archaeological Spaces

Andrew Bevan and Mark Lake (eds) (2013)
Computational Approaches to Archaeological Spaces.

This multi-authored volume provides a snapshot of how historical built spaces, past cultural landscapes and archaeological distributions are currently being explored via computer-led, spatial analysis techniques. These contributions come at a compelling moment in the history of computational social science, given rapidly expanding access to high quality digital datasets, the considerable processing capabilities now offered by modern desktop and distributed computing, and a post-hype phase of academic research in which the important analytical, methodological and interpretative trade-offs associated with different techniques are being navigated with increased awareness and maturity.

The Origins and Spread of Domestic Animals in Southwest Asia and Europe

Sue Colledge, James Conolly, Keith Dobney, Katie Manning and Stephen Shennan (eds) (2013)
The Origins and Spread of Domestic Animals in Southwest Asia and Europe.

This volume addresses the fundamental and broad-scale questions concerning the spread of early animal herding from its origins in the Near East into Europe beginning in the mid-10th millennium BC. Original work by more than 30 leading international researchers brings together our current knowledge about the origins and spread of animal domestication. In this comprehensive book, the zooarchaeological record and discussions of the evolution and development of Neolithic stock-keeping take centre stage in the debate over the profound effects of the Neolithic revolution on both our biological and cultural evolution.

Becoming Roman? Diverging Identities and Experiences in Ancient Northwest Italy

Ralph Haeussler (2013)
Becoming Roman? Diverging Identities and Experiences in Ancient Northwest Italy.

Few empires had such an impact on the conquered peoples as did the Roman empire, creating social, economic, and cultural changes that erased long-standing differences in material culture, languages, cults, rituals and identities. But even Rome could not create a single unified culture. Individual decisions introduced changes in material culture, identity and behaviour, creating local cultures within the global world of the Roman empire that were neither Roman nor native. The author uses northwest Italy as an exemplary case as it went from a marginal zone to one of the most flourishing and strongly urbanised regions of Italy, while developing a unique regional culture.

Buddhist Landscapes in Central India: Sanchi Hill and Archaeologies of Religious and Social change, c. Third Century BC to Fifth Century AD

Julia Shaw (2013)
Buddhist Landscapes in Central India: Sanchi Hill and Archaeologies of Religious and Social change, c. Third Century BC to Fifth Century AD (originally published in 2007 by the British Association of South Asian Studies).

This book presents the first integrated study of settlement archaeology and Buddhist history, carried out in the area around Sanchi, a Central Indian UNESCO World Heritage site. It is a comprehensive, data-rich and heavily illustrated work which provides an archaeological basis for assessing theories regarding the dialectical relationship between Buddhism and surrounding lay populations. It also sheds light on the impact of the introduction of Buddhism on changing settlement patterns and land use. This title is sponsored by the British Association of South Asian Studies

Many other books have been published by Institute staff between 2012 and 2013; some of these are featured below:

Stonehenge: Exploring the Greatest Stone Age Mystery.

Mike Parker Pearson (2012)
Stonehenge: Exploring the Greatest Stone Age Mystery.London: Simon & Schuster.

Through a combination of years of excavation, post-excavation and archaeological science, Mike Parker Pearson and his team have retold the story of Stonehenge. Their new evidence changes many long-standing beliefs about Stonehenge, its chronology and its use. The book sets out a new theory of Stonehenge’s significance, as a monument to the ancestors, built as a symbol of political unification.

From Machair to Mountains: Archaeological Survey and Excavation in South Uist

Mike Parker Pearson (ed.) (2012
From Machair to Mountains: Archaeological Survey and Excavation in South Uist. SEARCH monograph 4. Oxford: Oxbow.

This book presents the results of over 20 years of archaeological research involving archaeologists from Sheffield, Cardiff and other universities on the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides. Hundreds of sites have been discovered and many have been investigated by survey and excavation to determine their date and significance. Highlights include Neolithic tombs, Beaker and Early Bronze Age occupation sites, Iron Age settlements, Norse and Medieval duns and townships, and early modern shielings and blackhouses.

Development-led Archaeology in Northwest Europe

Leo Webley, Marc Vander Linden, Colin Haselgrove and Richard Bradley (eds) (2012)
Development-led Archaeology in Northwest Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.

Many countries in northern Europe have seen a huge expansion in development-led archaeology over the past few decades. Legislation, frameworks for heritage management and codes of practice have developed along similar but different lines. For the first time, these 12 papers bring together data on development-led archaeology in Britain, Ireland, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark in order to review and evaluate key common issues relating to organisation, practice, legal frameworks and quality management.

“... Quadrangles Where Wisdom Honours Herself”

Adrian M. Chadwick, David Gilbert and John Moore (eds) (2012)
“... Quadrangles Where Wisdom Honours Herself”. Oxford: JMHS.

A multi-author volume that presents an academic synthesis of the findings of a four-year programme of archaeological interventions at Christ Church, Oxford. This book takes a chronological approach and sets the results into their wider context. These include a unique assemblage of ceramic and glass vessels associated with metallurgical, chemical and alchemical experimentation thought to be one of the earliest in Britain, but also of wider international significance.

Beyond the Fertile Crescent: Late Palaeolithic and Neolithic Communities of the Jordanian Steppe. The Azraq Basin Project, Volume 1

Andrew Garrard and Brian Byrd (2013)
Beyond the Fertile Crescent: Late Palaeolithic and Neolithic Communities of the Jordanian Steppe. The Azraq Basin Project, Volume 1. Oxford: Oxbow.

This is the first volume of the ‘Azraq Basin Project’, a large-scale survey and excavation project which was undertaken in the steppe, desert and oasis environments of north-eastern Jordan. The project explored Epipalaeolithic and Neolithic communities from the last glacial maximum through until the early Holocene when farming villages had become established in the adjacent Levantine Corridor. Following introductory sections on the history of the project and the environmental context, the volume contains a detailed analysis of the geological context and technology of the ten late Upper Palaeolithic and Epipalaeolithic sites which were investigated.

Star Carr: Life in Britain after the Ice Age. York: Council for British Archaeology

Nicky Milner, Barry Taylor, Chantal Conneller and Tim Schadla-Hall (2013)
Star Carr: Life in Britain after the Ice Age. York: Council for British Archaeology.

This book brings up-to-date the story of Star Carr, one of the most famous and important prehistoric sites in Europe dating to the early Mesolithic period (c.9000BC). New excavations have revealed a remarkable collection of organic artefacts and the remains of what may be the earliest house ever found in Britain. The book also discusses other important Mesolithic sites in Britain and Europe to consider how our view of life after the Ice Age is being transformed.

Landscapes of Defence in Early Medieval Europe

John Baker, Stuart Brookes and Andrew Reynolds (eds) (2013)
Landscapes of Defence in Early Medieval Europe. Turnhout: Brepols.

This collection of papers is the result of a conference at UCL, which addressed the scale and form of civil defences in early medieval Europe, c.800–1000. Offering new interdisciplinary perspectives driven by a landscape approach, this book provides a new agenda for the study of militarised landscapes in pan-European perspective, bringing together new evidence and new methodologies from Anglo-Saxon England to the eastern part of the Carolingian Empire and from Scandinavia to the Iberian Peninsula.

Early Medieval Art and Archaeology in the Northern World: Studies in Honour of James Graham-Campbell

Andrew Reynolds and Leslie Webster (eds) (2013)
Early Medieval Art and Archaeology in the Northern World: Studies in Honour of James Graham-Campbell. Leiden and Boston: Brill

This volume brings together leading experts on the European early Middle Ages in a celebration of the life and work of a former member of the Institute’s staff. The geographical coverage ranges from Ireland to Eastern Europe and from Scandinavia to Spain, with 42 original contributions on the art, archaeology, history and literature of European medieval societies between the 5th and 13th centuries.

Beyond the Burghal Hidage: Anglo-Saxon Civil Defence in the Viking Age

John Baker and Stuart Brookes (2013)
Beyond the Burghal Hidage: Anglo-Saxon Civil Defence in the Viking Age. Leiden and Boston: Brill.

As the title suggests, this book takes the study of Anglo-Saxon civil defence away from traditional historical and archaeological fields, and uses a groundbreaking interdisciplinary approach to examine warfare and public responses to organised violence through their impact on the landscape. By bringing together the evidence from a wide range of archaeological, onomastic and historical sources, the authors are able to reconstruct complex strategic and military landscapes, and to show how important detailed knowledge of early medieval infrastructure and communications is to our understanding of Anglo-Saxon preparedness for war, and to the situating of major defensive works within their wider strategic context. The result is a significant and far-reaching re-evaluation of the evolution of late Anglo-Saxon defensive arrangements.

Viking Art

James Graham-Campbell (2013)
Viking Art. London and New York: Thames & Hudson.

This survey of the visual arts of Scandinavia during the Viking Age, from the late 8th to the end of the 11th century AD, includes works produced in the Scandinavian settlements overseas, from Iceland to Russia (including Britain and Ireland). The opening chapter provides the historical and geographical background to the emergence of Viking art, the development of which is then described and discussed chronologically, according to the six main styles into which it has been divided. The book’s conclusion looks at the art from a religious perspective – in relation to both pagan Viking mythology and the Conversion period – as well as at its legacy.

The Making of the Middle Sea: A History of the Mediterranean from the Beginning to the Emergence of the Classical World

Cyprian Broodbank (2013)
The Making of the Middle Sea: A History of the Mediterranean from the Beginning to the Emergence of the Classical World. London and New York: Thames & Hudson and Oxford University Press.

The Mediterranean is one of the most dynamic cockpits of human history on the planet, and broad-ranging studies of its later phases abound. This book is the first large-scale interpretative synthesis for a generation of the deeper-time, primarily archaeological, history of the Mediterranean, from its earliest peopling up to the threshold of the Classical World (including African, European and Near Eastern dimensions), and of how this maritime theatre first emerged as a distinctive cultural entity, a world around a Middle Sea.

Archaeology of Religious Change

Julia Shaw (ed.) (2013)
Archaeology of Religious Change. World Archaeology 45.1.Abingdon: Routledge.

This volume explores archaeology’s contribution to the study of religious change, transmission, interaction and reception. While the study of how certain religious traditions move into new areas and relate to pre-existing religious, cultural, political and economic structures has been dominated by sociology, anthropology and comparative religion, archaeology has made significant contributions to the field. The volume brings together recent field-based research on the material correlates of religious change, with a particular focus on studies which look beyond the traditional ritual-based focus of religious change, to its wider economic, political or ‘practical’ ramifications.

The Later Prehistory of the Badia: Excavation and Surveys in Eastern Jordan, Volume 2

Alison V. G. Betts, Dawn Cropper, Louise Martin and Carol McCartney (2013)
The Later Prehistory of the Badia: Excavation and Surveys in Eastern Jordan, Volume 2. Oxford: Council for British Research in the Levant/Oxbow Books.

This is the second of two volumes to document extensive surveys and excavations in the arid Jordanian badia region from Al-Azraq to the Iraqi border over the period 1979–1996. Broadly, it covers the Late Neolithic and Chalcolithic of the eastern badia including Late Epipaleolithic campsites in the foothills of Jebel Druze andevidence for extensive hunting in the central basalt region in the late Aceramic Neolithic. The volume details the spread of campsites and short-term occupation in the region. The first appearance of sheep and goat as part of the steppic economy is documented alongside traditional practices of hunting and foraging. New models are proposed for the introduction of domesticated animals into the steppe as a precursor to a full nomadic pastoral economy.

Mediterranean Islands, Fragile Communities and Persistent Landscapes: Antikythera in Long-term Perspective

Andrew Bevan and James Conolly (2013)
Mediterranean Islands, Fragile Communities and Persistent Landscapes: Antikythera in Long-term Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

This book brings together various approaches to Mediterranean landscape ecology, island cultures and long-term human history in considering the long-term archaeological and historical record of Antikythera, a tiny island perched on the edge of the Aegean and Ionian seas. Small islands often undergo sharp demographic changes, with periods of near-complete abandonment followed by acts of recolonisation. They also get incorporated in revealing ways into wider social, economic and political networks, becoming places for political and economic refugees, hunters, tourists, hermits and pirates to name just a few. Antikythera provides one of the best-documented long-term records of these fluctuating and sometimes eccentric responses to a wider world.

Living by the Sword: The Archaeology of Brisley Farm, Ashford, Kent

Jim Stevenson (2013)
Living by the Sword: The Archaeology of Brisley Farm, Ashford, Kent. SpoilHeap monograph 6. Dorchester: SpoilHeap Publications.

This volume presents the findings of ten archaeological investigations at Brisley Farm, Chilmington Green and Ashford, excavated between 1998 and 2009. Activity ranged from the Mesolithic through to the early post-medieval period. In the Late Iron Age, Brisley Farm was the focus of exceptional settlement including ritual elements and two warrior burials, the latest known from Britain.

Ceramic Petrography: The Interpretation of Archaeological Pottery and Related Artefacts in Thin Section

Patrick S. Quinn (2013)
Ceramic Petrography: The Interpretation of Archaeological Pottery and Related Artefacts in Thin Section. Oxford: Archaeopress.

This book examines ancient ceramics in thin section under the polarizing light microscope and provides methodological and practical guidelines for petrographic study. Over 200 colour photomicrographs of a range of ceramics from many different archaeological periods and geographic regions provide a reference manual for the identification and interpretation of compositional and microstructural phenomena. The volume also serves as a textbook for both training and self-study in thin section petrography and archaeological ceramic analysis.

The Archaeology of the Second World War: Uncovering Britain’s Wartime Heritage

Gabriel Moshenska (2013)
The Archaeology of the Second World War: Uncovering Britain’s Wartime Heritage. Barnsley: Pen & Sword Archaeology.

The archaeology of the Second World War in Britain is of growing interest to researchers, heritage professionals and the public. This book provides an overview of the main strands of research, viewed through the lens of the people who lived, worked and fought in the conflict, including sections on Civil Defence, the war at sea, childhood in wartime, and Prisoners of War.

Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency

Rodney Harrison, Sarah Byrne and Anne Clarke (eds) (2013)
Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency. Santa Fe: SAR Press.

'Reassembling the Collection' presents innovative approaches to the study of historical and contemporary engagements between museums and the various individuals and communities who were (and are) involved in their production and consumption. Interdisciplinary in scope and international in coverage, it addresses fundamental questions about the nature, value, and efficacy of museum collections in a postcolonial world, and the entangled agencies of those who have made, traded, received, collected, curated, worked with, researched, viewed, and experienced them in the past and present.

Ivories from Nimrud VII, Ivories from Rooms SW11/12 & T10, Fort Shalmaneser

Georgina Herrmann and Stuart Laidlaw (2013)
Ivories from Nimrud VII, Ivories from Rooms SW11/12 & T10, Fort Shalmaneser. London: British Institute for the Study of Iraq.

The ivories found at Nimrud present a unique resource for studying the minor arts of the Levantine world. The present volume completes the publication of the assemblages from Fort Shalmaneser, as far as records permit. There are at least twice as many Phoenician ivories than the other Levantine and Assyrian ivories. They form therefore an incredible archive, recording the lost art of the Phoenicians, long famed as master craftsmen.